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plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
to those lawmakers and to the american people his take on the u.s. military involve in the the north african nation, which began just over a week ago. white house correspondent mike emanuel is at the national defense university, the site of the speech tonight with a preview. mike? >> reporter: good evening. president obama will speak to a mostly military audience in the auditorium about why he authorized military force in libya. and where the mission goes from here. military intervention by the u.s. and allies appeared to have shifted momentum in favor of the rebels who fought their way to muammar gaddafi's hometown of sirte. >> clearly, the opposition is not well-organized and it's not a very robust organization. that is obvious. so any gain that they make is tenuous based on that. >> reporter: in a town hall on univision simulcast in spanish, president obama reiterated about libya. >> our involvement is there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: over the weekend, mr. obama explained why he believed military action was necessary. >> i firmly believe that w
, this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and
of power. >> as u.s. president obama outlines his position, delegates from dozens of country s arriie in london to discuss libya's future. >>> hello, 5:00 a.m. in washington, 10:00 a.m. in london. >> you're watching "world one live" from london. also ahead. >>> this is a pro-government rally, organized to show support for syria's president assad. >>> more trouble at the japan fukushima nuclear plant. a plutonium leak and tons of contaminated water are the latest hazards. >> good news out of denmark. watch this. >> yeah! >> yes! >> delight for police searching for a missing 3-year-old as news comes in that he's been found. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya and foreign ministers from more than 40 countries are meeting in london today to talk about how libya can move ahead without moammar gadhafi. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton's going to be there, so will the british prime minister david cameron and the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon. there will be a strong showing from the arab world with representatives from qatar, jordan, lebanon, iraq, morocco and tunisia. the talks
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
moammar gadhafi in power. hillary clinton represents the u.s. ban ki moon and more will attend. they called on gadhafi to leave libya. >>> the u.s. president made his case to fellow americans for intervening in libya's civil war. barack obama said the u.s. had a responsibility to act to the overt a civilian massacre but not to seek by force. libyan fighters very run into resistance. >>> disturbing news we're hearing about radiation levels at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. radioactive water may be leaking from a containment vessel. they've also found plutonium in the soil, but the levels, they say, are not harmful to humans. >>> pro-government demonstrations are expected in syria on tuesday. one of the latest places to have anti-government protests being held. "world business" starts now. >>> good morning, from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> and i'm pauline chu, and this is world business today. the top stories on this tuesday, march 29th. u.s. president barack obama tries to explain his country's intervention in libya, but his critics are counting the cost of t
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed fr per wldikmo iorti outh, t ppti o what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president obama than his conference there. >> the
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. gets ready to hand off the mission in libya, after president obama makes his case to the nation, that military intervention was necessary. >>> from california, a sliding hillside puts homes in danger. families told to get out before their houses tumbled down. >>> and the drastic measures taken by one teen who wanted a new car. wait until you hear what she did to get it. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. president obama takes his case for military action against libya on the road today. it will be part of a major speech that mr. obama gives later today. >> right here in new york. >> and last night, the president spoke to the nation to defend his choices and also to announce that nato will take over the lead role tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us from washington with all the details. good morning, emily. >> reporter: peggy and rob, good morning to you. before president obama used the word libya last night, he said the words international effort. and he said the world had had a responsibility to a
made the case on u.s. involvement in libya, the military is preparing to scale back the role and let nato take command. at the same time, members from 40 nations gather in london to discuss the end game in libya and a possible future without muammar qaddafi. at home nato allied supreme commander in europe, is telling congress he is optimistic muammar qaddafi will fall under the pressure. >> we have a chance at muammar qaddafi leaving because the entire international community is again him. >>shepard: muammar qaddafi ruled for four decades and repeatedly said he will never give up and despite international strikes against his military, the rebels say the government is better armed and organization than anything makeshift they come up with. there are muammar qaddafi's government tanks and rockets driving back the open opposition. though are trying to retreat, the relatives from a town. >> regular cars are fighting with machine guns, et cetera, et cetera, we did not have arms or we would finish muammar qaddafi in a few days. >>shepard: a spokesman for the opposition in london asking the
housing the u.s. mission to the united nations. the ronald h. brown building was commerce secretary during clinton's first term in office. >>> the shuttle "endeavour" arrives in the space shuttle tonight. it's set to lift off for the final space mission. it's time to continue to suzanne malveaux. i'll be over to talk about the obama doctrine. >>> live from studio 7, i'm suzanne malveaux. want to get you up to speed. i want to go directly to ras lanouf. what is the latest over there? >> hi, suzanne, well, for the last hour and a half, we've been hearing and seeing a fairly heavy artillery barrage. we've been hearing the explosions taking place on the other side of ras lanouf. they are trading artillery with gadhafi's military. this is a blow to the opposition that has been forced back from its positions in ben jawad, 40 miles to the west of here. they came under heavy sustained artillery, tank and rocket fire, as well as snipers inside that town firing on them. they were unable to sustain that, stand up against it. we saw them beating a hastety retreat from ben jawad coming here to r
.com click on the you decide link today. we're asking if the u.s. should arm libya's rebels. there are some questions about that. click on your answer and you can see how other people are voting. so far more than a thouf you have weighed in. you can check it out at foxnews.com. so many tkpwres, about who the opposition is. gregg: the president didn't talk about arming the rebels but a lot of people are saying he really should have done that. we want your thoughts on that. in the meantime there is a new wave of protests in yemen this morning. take a look at this demonstrators calling for the immediate ouster of ali abdullah saleh and demanding political reforms. now ali abdullah saleh has promised to september down at the end of his term, dozens of protesters have been killed in yemen since antigovernment violent tkepl straeugtss broke out last month. and now syria where president's has resigned, they just quit. human rights groups claiming that dozen of antigovernment protesters were killed by the syrian troops. hundreds of house of progovernment demonstrators are flooding the streets of da
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
, this the morning after president obama said it would happen. watch this attack from the u.s.-led operation in the mediterranean. meanwhile, on the ground, where that tomahawk cruise missile is headed, reports from the desert that qaddafi soldiers are attacking rebel fighters with a hella machine gun and rocket fire. the lead libyan brigade, led by one of qaddafi's sons, pushing rebels away from the home town of sirte and sirte is where the battle will be joined. good morning, everybody. a lot of developments from oophnight and the morning here. welcome, i'm bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: very busy. goodgood morning, bill, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. these attacks come as pentagon officials tell fox news that they are closely watching a qaddafi facility that could be storing materials to make chemical weapons and although troops are standing their ground today, there are signs that qaddafi's inner circle may be starting to crack. bill: want to go live to rick leventhal, live from ras lanuf. rick, hello. >> we're running an active c
to our correspondent with the opposition right now. president obama tried to explain why the u.s. intervened military as gadhafi was closing in on benghazi a little more than a week ago. >> at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. an international mandate for action. a broad coalition preached to join us. the support of arab countries, and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. we also had the ability to stop gadhafi's forces in their tracks without putting american troops on the ground. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and more profoundly our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances, would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> a lot more on what the president said in a moment. we'll also look tonight in an incredibly disturbing incident that looked at a tripoli hotel full of journalists. this woman was dragged away by gadhafi officials, we have updates about what's happened since. i'll talk to nick robert son about it. the
there are big changes there, according to u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton today. she's been speaking at this emergency summit, conference of world leaders, all asking each other the same thing, that being what to do about moammar gadhafi. we're going to take you live to london in just a minute. they're also talking about the possibility that gadhafi could go into exile. but that, of course, opens up all kinds of questions as to where and who might be willing to take him. >>> first i want to go to senior international correspondent nic robertson live in tripoli. nic, before we talk about your trip to misrata, we've heard about large explosions where you are in tripoli just a short time ago. where were they? what did you hear? >> reporter: well, they were a couple of miles away from us. it's not possible to say what the target was. one of the three explosions was perhaps one of the loudest we've heard so far. and they all came within a minute of each other. what makes these explosions different from all the ones we've heard until now over the past week and a half, these came in dayligh
are in libya in the first place. he argued the u.s. had a responsibility to act in order to stop gadhafi from killing his own people, and the president took on critics who say the u.s. has no business getting involved. >> given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interest against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and our to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> but some insist the fundamental questions are still unanswered. house speaker boehner i still habit explained what success in libya will look like. while the president reiterated he wants gadhafi gone, he said that's not part of the mission. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our coalition would splinter. we would likely have to put u.s. troops on the ground to accomplish that mission. or risk killing many civilians in the air. to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> savannah, the speech was necessarily, had to give it. re
than gaddafi. host: we will he coverage of the president's speech to the nation of the u.s. involvement in libya coming from the national defense university. live cerage at 7:30 p.m. eastern time, 4:30 p.m. on the west coast. for more details, go to our web span.org.uesc- next caller. caller: mike x brother in law as a retired navy cmdr. winners in this latest war is a military industrial complex. mike, you are a good spokesperson for t work complex. is there ever a program of conflict resolution? what if all of the people working for him on conflict resolution -- we have all of these people and putting troop on the ground. where is conflict resolution in this scenario? guest: i would argue that there has been a concerted effort to avoid escalating this problem in libya. we saw that early on when there was a great deal of complaining about the fact that we were not getting involved sooner. during the course of that, there was this conflict resolution effort. the problem is there was a drum beatrom both extremes sides. there was a call for a no-fly zone. some wanted to go out there immed
a siege until they learn hostages had been killed. but that point, they stormed the building. the u.s. supreme court is hearing evidence from one of the largest 60's -- sex discrimination lawsuits in america. women are claiming women -- women who work for walmart claimed they were held back because of their gender. the lawsuit includes more than 1.5 million women. the u.s. department of education finds virginia tech $55,000 for waiting too long to notify students when the massacre was taken place -- was taking place in 2007. the amount imposed was the maximum allowed by law. in japan, 2.5 weeks after disaster, the president said the country is on max on alert over the crippled fukushima nuclear plant. they try to prevent radioactive water from leaking into the sea. the u.s. and u.k. are starting to detect very low levels of radioactive iodine in the air. our science correspondent has the story. this does contain flash photography. >> this is the front line of japan's nuclear crisis. teams of workers braving me fukushima -- the fukushima power station. some areas are too contaminated t
questions out there about the mission in libya, what's the goal of the u.s.? what's the exit strategy? how will the u.s. military be involved? are these all questions he sufficiently answered? >> i think did he. if he's getting criticized that heavily from left and right, he's striking a balance. he made clear that we went in to avoid what he described as violence on a horrific scale in benghazi, that again the mandate of the u.n. coalition that nato is now leading is to protect libyan civilians, i think that makes very clear what success looks like there, it means that libyan civilians are safe, safe in their houses, safe in their cities. at the same time, he made very clear that it is u.s. policy, and the policy of many of our allies. that libya needs to have a new government that responds to the demands of the libyan people. and we will pursue every diplomatic and economic means to that end and leveling the play be field militarily will certainly help. >> if he removes his forces from around misrata, pulls back troops to tripoli, and has all these armed civilians in serte and other plac
's explanation is logical. you may not agree with it but mr. obama can defend his position. if the u.s.a. is indeed an exceptional nation. and we can save lives without harming our country, we should. strong argument and talking points agrees with it. there is a valid criticism of mr. obama, however, in that he it not lead in this matter. if he feels so strongly about stopping qaddafi from killing people, he could have acted quicker and more decisively. he did not. that doesn't mean it was wrong to seek u.n. approval or world consensus. that is the smart thing to do. mr. obama was not publicly aggressive in doing that he laid back. i want the united states to be seen throughout the world as a noble country. that knows right from wrong. and will protect innocent people if it can. the president seems to want that as well but he is not loud enough about it. the speech tonight was good, but it should have been given earlier and with more passion. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. let's see if fox news chief political analyst brit hume agrees. he joins us from washington.
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
odyssey dawn to nato. the united states a huge part of nato? how much is the u.s. still on the hook? who will issue the orders? john bolton is here to go on the record. now, president obama, a few minutes ago. >> the president: gadhafi declared he would show no mercy to his own people if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte, could suffer a massacre that would have reverberated across the region and stained the conscience of the world. it was not in our national interests to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. in this particular country, libya, at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. international mandate for action. a coalition prepared to join us. the support of arab countries. and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. moreover, america has an important strategic interest in preventing gadhafi from overrunning those who oppose him. a massacre would have driven thousands of additional refugees across libya's borders. putting enormous
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama defends his decision to involvele the u.s. military in libya but vowed our troops will not be used to overthrow moammar gadhafi by force. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> did the president say enough to quiet his critics? >> prince harry joins a punishing expedition to the north pole. we are with him live. >> and buried. a snow boarder crashes and becomes trapped upside down in six feet of snow. his helmet camera captured it all including a desperate call to his wife. >> i'm stuck in a tree well. give them my phone number. >> are you serious? >> i'm going to die if they don't find me. >> luckily, she did and he was finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us today, tuesday, march 29, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer. president obama vowed america's role would be limited in libya last night. he told the nation we had fulfilled the pledge, we had done wha
understanding, as well. and how many did we drop? >> 200. >> this hour, susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations, senator joe lieberman. plus, nearly 30 years to the day since white house press secretary james brady was shot during assassination attempt on president ronald reagan. gun control advocates, jim and sarah brady are here for a rare live interview. >> caught fire. shot fire. >> followup, rawhide is okay? good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama says that the u.s. has done its job in libya and is reallyf trade hand over control to nato but tell take longer than he has said. nbc news has learned today that the handover will not be tomorrow, more likely toward the end of the week. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is at a libya summit in london today. this morning, she met with an envoy to discuss the next steps. >> we cannot and must not attempt to impose our will on the people of libya, but we can and must stand with them as they determine their own destiny. >> today, a top nato commander said that international pressure will li
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
the case for this intervention. u.s. interests have to be met if we are going to intervene. u.s. interests can't just mean validating some kind of post american theory of intervention, wherein, we wait for the arab league and the united nations to tell us thumbs up america you can go now and act and get on the -- get in the back of the bus and wait for the french to lead us. that's not inspirational. >> greta: i must confess when i heard reports that gadhafi was saying he would show no mercy to his people and compared them to rats and threatened to go door-to-door, when that was going on, it was so horrible that -- now with 20/20 hindsight, it easy for me to think why is this military action for this humanitarian purpose, when more people are dying in other parts of the world? >> that's a good question. that's the 600 million dollar a day question that is being asked now. because that's the cost incurred by americans as we support the no-fly zone. which of course the no-fly zone the intervention or enactment is turning into more than that. again, disappointing speech. because we didn't get
likely have to put u.s. troops on the ground to accomplish that mission, or risk killing many civilians from the air. the danger posed to our men and women in uniform would be far greater. so would the cost and our share of the responsibility for what comes next. to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq and their future, but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly a trillion dollars. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. as the bulk of our military effort ratchets down, what we can do, and we will do, is support the aspirations of the libyan people. we have intervened to stop the massacre, and we will work with our allies and partners to maintain the safety of civilians. we will deny the regime arms, cut off its supplies of cash, assist the opposition, and work with other nations to hasten the day when gaddafi leaves power. it may not happen overnight. a badly weakened gaddafi is trying desperately to
of president obama's nationally televised promise that the u.s. military role in libya would be of limited time and limited scope. is that a promise the president can keep if his end game requires gadhafi to go? our senior analyst david gergen is with us, he's advised four u.s. presidents. david, the timing here is horrible for the administration. you can't score this based on one day, but the president of the united states addresses the american people last night and addresses the world. he says the american involvement will be of limited time, of limited scope, and then the day after, the day after, the opposition forces, with whom he has thrown his lot, get routed on the battle field. what's the choice the president faces? >> very difficult choice, john. with the rebels in retreat now and gadhafi forces on the offensive, and we just heard a reporting that the rebels are not going to be satisfied just holding on to the east. they want to go all the way to tripoli. what i think is becoming apparent is they can't get to tripoli unless nato and the united states included go -- you know, do this
on "good morning america" and appeared to be suggesting that the u.s. is considering a request to arm the rebel opposition. some members of the coalition are pushing for this, but there are open questions about who the opposition is. i asked a pentagon official just that yesterday. >> we're not talking with the opposition. we have -- we would like a much better understanding of the opposition. we don't have it. so, yes, it does matter to us, and we're trying to fill in those knowledge gaps. >> reporter: that includes questions about towns in eastern libya, which have a history of anti-american activity and have served as recruiting zones in towns like darnah. in april, 2008, a massive intelligence find in northern iraq showed 19% of the suicide bombers in iraq came from darnah, libya. "newsweek" did a cover story on this in april, 2008, focusing on darnah and the recruitment by al-qaeda of suicide bombers in the libyan town. we've asked the state department about it and have been told that they're not doing interviews on the issue of the opposition at this point in time. megyn? megyn:
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
the nation. saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter in mass graves before taking action. >> gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. and its allies are doing enough to push him out. we will talk with tu.s. baee ambassador to the u.n. and john mccain. >>> the snake hunt. the venomous cobra that escaped from the bronx zoo remains on loose this morning creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers "early" this tuesday morning, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. welcome back to the country. the time zone, the program. >> nice to be back sitting next to you, chris. >>> things were busy while i was away. >>> more on the president speech's last night and that ongoing battle for libya. this morning, rebel forces are macing more resistance from gadhafi militias. a state department diplomat is going to benghazi and meet with rebel leaders for the first time. in the meantime, secretary of st
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama addresses the nation saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi's forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> but nearly two weeks in to the mission, gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. is doing enough to push him out. we'll talk with the president's ambassador to the u.n. and with republican senator john mccain. >>> walmart lawsuit. a massive sex discrimination suit against the retail giant heads to the supreme court today. it could involve more than a million female employees and cost america's biggest employer billions of dollars. >>> and the snake hunt. the venomous cobra remains on the loose creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. >> good to have you back. welcome back to the country, the time zone. >> nice to be back sitting
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
to ge get rid of him and the opposition needs continued military support, not a ground invasion by the u.s. or any other western power, but air support, all the way to tripoli, very few people want to die for gadhafi, so if we'll continue the model we have in place, following the rebels, knocking out tank and arrest tiltillerar will win and a lot of people will die unnecessarily. >> you have criticized president obama for taking too long. he made the point that he took 31 days to build this coalition where in bosnia it took a year. >> the opposition forced had gadhafi on the ropes and we did not impose a no fly zone where it would matter the most. we made mistakes in iraq, and to my fellow republican friends, nobody complained about the cost of iraq or afghanistan on our watch. i'm tired of hearing people talk about it cost too much. let me tell you about what it will cost if gadhafi comes back into power, instability forever, incredible oil price spikes. young people throughout the arab world thinking we let them down at a time we could help them. so the balance sheet of keeping him versu
that the u.s. intervened to prevent the slaughter of civilians. before we show you more of what he had to say let's go rapid fire around the table. pat buchanan, five seconds or less, how would you characterize the president's speech? >> left more questions open than answered. >> donny deutsche? >> i thought it was fantastic. >> of course you did. >> he looked like a leader and showed power of track cattle. >> i think it was solid. and holes in others. >> i still don't get his attempts to explain it why we don't go into syria again and another country. >> that was the question left unanswered. speaking in washington last night the president insisted not taking action would have been a betrayal of who we are as americans. >> if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte,ed the conscience the world. it was not in our national interest to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. >> he ruled out targeting moammar gadhafi. warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a mistake as costly as the war in iraq. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our co
the transfer to nato leadership by wednesday. the u.s. will turn over the reins. the coalition has 16 members of the data. we will show you those if you have not seen the list. let's take a call from deidre alabama, a democrat. >> i want to say kudos to president obama. he did what he needed to do. i feel as a democrat that a man with his intellect knows exactly what he is doing. i believe the american people should stand behind him and understand he is doing what he can to keep us safe and other countries save as well. >> what was the most powerful argument the president made tonight for your ears? >> he made so many good, valid points. as far as the no-fly zone, as far as i am concerned, like what happened with 9/11, i do not feel if president obama was president at the time that would have happened. what he is doing is heartfelt. he cares for all of these other countries. he cares for the american people. >> mike is in new haven ohio, an independent there. did the president make the case for you tonight? >> no, he did not. people better wake up. he starts a war, it takes off for brazil, an
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